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schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
degree was running its own foreign policy. one of the big things we're looking to understand about ping's government over the next year or two is whether he can bring the pla under his control. he's already been head of the military commission which is really the most powerful role there. it took hu jintao a few years before he got named to that post. >> rose: david sanger thank you as always. >> thank you, charlie. >> we look at politics the republican and democratic party. the republican national committee comes in the way of political conference where republican leaders met to discuss the future of their party. report contained an endorsement of comprehensive immigration reform and extensive discussion of social issues. the gop has struggled to define itself since the loss in the 2012 presidential election. joining me to help me understand this from washington al lent fr boomberg view andark halperin from "time" magazine. i'm pleased to have both of them back on this program. i begin with this al. as you know i've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there ge
look at them as the experts in foreign policy and military intervention. how long do you have to be and on how big a scale before we stop listening. i would like to hear about acid reflux, or home remedies for boils. when it comes to the wisdom of invading iraq, you have expired, all of you have. you had your time, you failed, it is over.failed. it is over. "first look" is up next. >>> good morning. it's the first day of spring. right now on "first look", obama makes his inaugural visit. >> new information about the explosion that killed our marines when a mortar ground exploded. >>> inside the sinister murder plot hatched by a central florida student. >> everybody stuck on a plane wanted to order a pizza. meet the group that did. >>> and what's that jumping out of the trunk of the car. president obama will arrive in israel has his first visit as commander in chief. it comes as peace plans remain elusive. nbc news white house correspondent peter alexander joins us live from jerusalem. peter, good morning. >> good morning to you. a beautiful day here in jerusalem. you can see t
time ago to martin and dick, now director of the foreign-policy at brookings institution. for coming in. very cordial between the two men. do you think real differences remain between them over iran? but there are inevitably some differences between israel, a small country in iran posing neighborhood, and the united states, which has more than 1000 nuclear weapons in its arsenal. iran is not about to attack the united states. having said that, the president has put out a timeline of a year. mr. netanyahu has not contradicted him. and i do not think he wanted to show any difference during this visit, for sure. he does not want any daylight to show between the president and prime minister. but nevertheless, i think he has said i think it twice publicly and that allows the negotiation to be tested. >> president obama stressed resolving it diplomatically and mr. netanyahu talk about israel have been the right to independently defend itself. you think that is not necessarily conflict between those two positions? necessarily. the president said israel has the right to defend itself. his respo
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
the significance of this visit and what it means for u.s. foreign policy moving forward. when we come back, the water cooler watching democracy at its finest. another political brawl in the ukrainian parliament. we have diving and fighting in the parliament. more details when "way too early" comes back. max and penny kept our bookstore exciting and would always come to my rescue. but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. >>> all right. time for the water cooler. democracy in action. ukrainian style. check it out in the parliament yesterday. where is it going to start? always looking for where it's going to start. push, push, push. just a melee breaks out. fistacuffs. somebody obviously spoke russian and they want to speak ukrainian. there was nearly an identical brawl back in decem
to make it seem like the war in iraq thing was actually a great idea and not the worst foreign policy disaster in maybe a century. there's paul wolfowitz defending it over the weekend, and michael oh han lon. and donald rumsfeld saying ten years ago began the long difficult work of liberating 25 million iraqis, all who played a roll in history deserve our respect and appreciation. the nervous thing is that he has the gall to use the word history and saying it was all about liberating the iraqi people. they're trying to do it. they're using the tenth year anniversary of the war to make you believe it didn't happen the way it happened. to try to make you believe it was all about liberating the iraqi people from the tyrant. they want you to believe what they proposed to the american people ten, will he have enyears ago, go liberate them from a tyrant. the american said we should, and we went and were greeted as lib ray tors, we knew it would take eight and a half years and cost millions and lose many people. they say it was hard but that difficult liberate work is what we signed up for a
their own energy. lou: we have not address the energy -- issue central to our foreign policy go about -- over last two decades, and it's about damn time our leaders started thinking about them. thank you both. we appreciate very much. thank you. much more on the president's day in israel and the tensions that are rising in the middle east. we will have much more throughout this broadcast. the president's gun-control agenda is on life support. we'll take a look at the real reason for its demise in tonight's "chalk talk". staying the course. fed chair ben bernanke says easing money is here to stay. ubs chief economist with us on the economy, the market, and the fed next. ♪ ♪ lou: ben bernanke's federal reserve keeping money cheap, plentiful. chief economist for ubs will tell us whether this is sufficient magic for the market through the remainder of the year. let's take a look at what happened on wall street. today's talks are moving higher. investors expecting just the news that they received, the fed's standing fast, holding steady, helping -- keeping 85 billion a month into the m
of his top strategic foreign policy advisors and he assumes because that is the sentence that is focused on that is what he wants to come out of the press conference. >> bret: next up, the two leaders on syria and the developing situation with the possibility of chemical weapons. ♪ looking for a litter with natural ingredients that helps neutralize odors. discover tidy cats pure nature. uniquely formulated with cedar, pine, and corn. >>> i am deeply skeptical of any claim in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. i made clear that use of chemical weapons is a game changer. i won't make an announcement today about the next steps because we have to gather the facts. when you start seeing weapons that can cause potential devastation, and mass casualties, a you let that genie out of the bottle, then you are looking potentially at especially more horrific scenes than we have already seen in syria. >> bret: president obama talking about the possibility of the chemical weapons were used in syria. the house intelligence chairman mike rogers says there is a high probably now the
. >> in a visit important to our nation's security, the republican attacks against this president's foreign policy seemed puny, especially when the president and prime minister were actually laughing. >> and i want to express a special thanks to sarah as well as your two sons for their warmth and hospitality. it was wonderful to see them. they are -- i did inform the prime minister that they are very good looking young men who clearly got their looks from their mother. >> well, i can say the same of your daughters. >> this is true. our goal is to improve our gene pool by marrying women better than we are. >> this is the reality. the gop consistently tries to paint the president as someone that he isn't. they falsely accuse him of being anti-american, of being lazy, of being born in another court, and then comes the reality. today it was there for the world to see. joining me now is jim warren, washington bureau chief of "the new york daily news" and msnbc contribute are to, joy reid. thank you both for being here tonight. >> thank you. >> jim, iran, syria, the peace process, these are really tough
knew when talking about politician that is didn't know or knew, we knew. i was in u.s. foreign policy undergrad at the time and screaming at top of my lungs this is a lie this is a lie. certainly hillary clinton is not the president today because she couldn't see what we could all see. >> not going to stop her from being president in four years. >> no, and i don't agree that's why she's not president today. >> why didn't she get the nomination? >> she got beat, she got trumped and it had nothing to do with the positions on the war, really didn't. i take your point, i really do and i don't want to overly defend her. >> i'm a hillary fan. >> is that why hillary's not president? >> no, i just think that so many people wanted a black man rather than a woman in power like they were first in line. >> well, i guess we could debate it all night. zerlina maxwell and lauren windsor, thank you all for your great insights. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ ♪ and then there are
-- no pressure. >>> tonight president obama is traveling to israel in his first foreign policy trip since winning re-election. tomorrow he'll met with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. topping the agenda, iran's nuclear ambitions. on thursday the president will tour the west bank and meet with mahmoud abbas, president of the palestinian authority. then friday it's on to jordan for meetings with king abdullah before returning back to washington on saturday. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." of all the ways the iraq war was sold to the american people under false pretense, one of the most galling was we could win this war on the cheap both in lives and in treasure. a new report from brown university, the cost of war study, proves just how wrong that early promise was. the cost in lives was of course overwhelming and far more than predicted. in total, more than 190,000 people lost their lives due to the war. 70% of them were iraqi civilians. that's 190,000 people dead. to give you an idea of the enormity of that number, enough people died in that war to fill yankee stadiu
one but there are very serious foreign policy issues here, not the least of being the civil war in syria. the white house says it is looking into allegations about the use of chemical weapons. the house and intelligence committee says there is quote high probability that chemical agents were useed. what will prime minister netanyahu be asking of the united states in terms of ending the on flikt in syria? >> well, first of all, the president, president obama's, credibility is very, very critical. they is said from the white house podium that any use from the chemical weapons would be a red line. presumably this would be the trigger for more american involvement. as you know, craig, u.s. has been behind other allies, britain and france pressing on the u.s. to do more. we have done human. aid, nonlethal aid, helped to the combatance, but not what they have been pleading for. which is more weaponry. so there's a lot of pressure on the white house to become more involved in syria. this is skoesten shl because they have to wonder about what will follow the civil war. if assad is going
magazine, he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls and e-mails and tweets. each morning at seven eastern on c-span. >> 70,000 people have died since the protest of bashar al-assad and syria. there was a hearing on thursday. live coverage starts at 9:45 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> 34 years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks were created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you you as a public service by your television provider. >> edward demarco, the director of the federal housing finance agency testified on tuesday on the state of the housing market. and the future of fannie mae and freddie mac. this is two hours and 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee will come to order it without objection. the chair has authorized recess of the committee. at any time, the chair recognizes himself for two minutes for an opening statement. i would like to start off quoting from our witnesses testimony. few of us can imagine i
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
. when dick and i started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.-japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thou
of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and tweets. "washington journal" every morning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> said they hired a very expensive carriage. elizabeth monroe dressed herself in her best and went to the prison where she was being held. she met with madame lafayette and basically made her case public one. some stories say, the next day, she was released. it was not the next day. it was a couple of months. it's pretty much kept her from going to the guillotine. >> in some ways, she has her own cause. she works with the washington aquino orphan asylum. in some sense, that is somewhat more and -- modern. she does work politics in her parlor. >> our conversation with historians on elizabeth monroe catherine adams. it is now available on our web site. >> other generations are asking, how do we adapt? how do we move in this fast- paced world? millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we grew up. it has brought a sense of ease and adaptability. it has brought us the ability to be resilient to the economic cr
for so many years now. what are the prospects of that taking place. we know former foreign minister, with so much difficulty as policy minister, she will be at this dinner saturday night with netanyahu, john kerry and others trying to restart the peace talks. >> i would say to john kerry, good luck with that. if the americans really push for a renewed peace talks between the israelis and palestinians, i believe it will happen. neither side want to be the side that says no. will it be a real peace process with prospects of serious progress? i don't think so. and most analysts don't think so. because neither side is rooting for it. i always believe that time they are progress towards peace between the two sides is when each side realizes the limit of its own power. when israel realizes its weaponry will not sub jucate the palestinians forever and time is not on their side forever. until each side realizes that, i don't think there will be any real progress. there is no real demand for progress. it is also important to say that if there was a peace agreement on the table, i'm sure, and
teachers their reporting responsibility and require the administrator to review the policy and allow districts to immediately remove teachers suspected of child abuse and dismiss them at any point. >> veterans of foreign wars, another marine has died in nevada desert over the explosion. mourners held a vigil last night near the park with hundreds turning out to on the fallen marines killed in a training accident. six remain in the hospital. the marines are from camp lejeune, north carolina, training for a night warfare. >> every loss of life is heartbreaking whether that occurs in afghanistan, nevada, camp lejeune, north carolina, or anywhere else. >> the marine corps has suspended use of all 16 millimeter mortars until the investigation is complete. the defense department has yet to release the names of the dead. they are all under the age of 30. >> new information on monday night's fatal shooting of a car theft suspect by san jose police. the officer who fired the fatal shot also wounded a murder suspect during a shootout in november. the officer, a five-year veteran, sho
and relatively wealthy russians. about a third of the deposits in cyprus we know are foreign. a large chunk of them are russian. russia didn't get the eurozone into this mess. russia has been there to help. >> cyprus knows having turned to russia for help, it's policy makers who are opposed to higher tax on higher earnings in those banks and it is to some extent an ironic legacy because it was russia's bank failures that made cyprus a part of russians keeping their money in safer places offshore and reinvesting when the appropriate time came and now it's the same crisis in the eurozone which is driving the pendulum back the other way. steve, can you give us a sense of what happens now in moscow? >> well, there's many, many ways that the russians could lose out on this under the current plan. the risk of default. risk of changes to domestic tax rates that we have been alluded to that are attractive for those russian companies in cyprus. in terms of the broader solution, whether it is just the changing of the terms of that 2.5 billion euro loan, an extension, another 5 billion which is sensib
understand each other. let me move quickly to a national a foreign house will. he believes such a firm should exist, that we should have a fund to help us maintain our affordable housing stock. >> congressman, beverly is outside the bill of my responsibility. that's not policy decision for the congress. i didn't come here to have an opinion about the trust fund. >> i'll accept your answer. >> thank you. >> the gentleman's time has expired and we appreciate the comments. and with that we turn now to the gentleman from virginia. >> thank you. thank you for your candor and your lead. after many long years the gst these are beginning to turn a profit. i guess i would like to hear from you the advantages and disadvantages of the return to profitability for you as concerned what should we -- has it led to any change in tactics to accomplish this reform and your part? there are things that perhaps who would be wise to look out for with this positive turn of events but also recognizing that we really do need fundamental reform and the taxpayers have ponied up north of $180 billion. >> it's hard to se
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)